History Lessons

Navy museum salutes flags

Flag with a slogan (All photos by author)

Every year, more than 100,000 people tour the U.S. Naval Academy Museum in Annapolis, Maryland. Its website notes that there are “exhibits about the history of seapower, the development of the U.S. Navy, and the role of the U.S. Naval Academy in producing officers.” In addition, the museum houses a treasure trove of historic flags…. continue

History Lessons

Flags flap as WWII ends

Jubilant British citizens wave flags on V-E Day.

On May 8, 1945, the date World War II ended in Europe, a Pennsylvania soldier wrote home to his wife, Mary. He wanted to tell her about the flags he saw that day and the emotions he felt. Pfc. Marshall Line, 32, who was stationed with an air squadron in England, reminded her in his… continue

Flag Information

What to do with a Damaged or Retired American Flag

Honoring a symbol, Team Seymour holds flag retiring ceremony

The United States Flag Code dictates that any American flag that is worn, damaged or tattered beyond repair should be retired in a respectful and dignified manner. While the code allows for worn flags to be discreetly and professionally burned, there are also other options, including flag burials and – our personal favorite – donating… continue

History Lessons

Teen spotted flaw in state flag

Louisiana's state flag (louisiana.gov)

One of the more unusual – and somewhat gruesome – state flags features four birds and three drops of blood. The flag belongs to Louisiana, which is marking the 205th anniversary of its admission to the Union. Louisiana’s state flag was incorrect for many years, but a high school student with sharp eyes, D. Joseph… continue

History Lessons

American flag becomes superhero

Debut of 'Our Flag' comic

If you think Superman, Batman and Spider-Man are the only super-heroes in comic book history, you missed one named “The Flag.” You’ve also missed his genesis story. And his brief life. First published in 1941 and not long for the comic book world, “Our Flag” was published just as America leaned toward entering World War… continue